Writing in the Vocative Case

When names are addressed directly in writing, the practice is known as the vocative case. Always separate an individual’s name from the rest of a sentence with a comma or commas when he or she is addressed directly. For example, the following sentences represent the vocative case: I will see you later, Julia. (The speaker … Continue reading Writing in the Vocative Case

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Making Your Writing Clearer with Commas

Writers sometimes have difficulties with commas. Therefore, in order to make sure your commas are well-placed, you need to take a note of the common uses for this frequent form of punctuation. When You Should Use a Comma A comma is used in the following instances: After such transitional phrases as Consequently, As a result, … Continue reading Making Your Writing Clearer with Commas

Do You Have Hidden Verbs in Your Writing?

Hidden verbs keep writers from directly expressing themselves. Because verbs fuel your writing and give a sentence direction, they also enliven speech and phrasing. Verbs are hidden when we transform them into nouns, thereby making them less efficient in their jobs.   How to Uncover a Hidden Verb Therefore, verbs that are hidden often feature … Continue reading Do You Have Hidden Verbs in Your Writing?

Obsolete and Archaic Expressions: Bygone Words of the 18th Century

“Zounds!” “Zounds!” “I am surprised at the news!” The word, “zounds,” was used back in the 18th century to either convey indignation or surprise. Waits and Uncles The street singers you see depicted in drawings of caroling were called waits at the time while uncles were the names given to pawnbrokers. Trig: A Smart and … Continue reading Obsolete and Archaic Expressions: Bygone Words of the 18th Century

Obsolete Words: Archaic words from the 1700s

Some words from the 1700s are certainly interesting conservation-starters. Sprinkling them every now and then in your speech or writing, adds some flavor and fun to your communicative style. Bibliopoles and Chapmen For example, back in the 1700’s a bibliopole was a bookseller while a chapman was a peddler. A cordwainer was a shoemaker while … Continue reading Obsolete Words: Archaic words from the 1700s